It was a tough first quarter for equities. Here’s some reasons why…

It has generally been a rough first quarter for global stock markets. The rip-roaring gains that made 2017 so lucrative for investors came to a screeching halt in the first 3 months of this year.

The Nasdaq index, which boasts the biggest names in American tech among its constituents (including Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Nvidia among others), went into the red (a loss) for the year after a 3.5% fall during trading this week. The weakness came as investors worried about the future profitability of these companies, in light of a spate of bad press for them recently.

For example, Facebook shares were pulled down by over -12% for the month due to concerns about user privacy following the Cambridge Analytica scandal, while Amazon stock has been under pressure after coming under fire from Trump as well the European Union, which has had the Bezos behemoth in its sight for some time. Last month, the European Commission revealed plans to clamp down on the market dominance of the business of Google amongst other tech titans including Amazon by aiming to tax consumers differently.

Nvidia shares took a large hit too this month (down over -5%) after the firm said it would be halting tests for its autonomous vehicles in light of an incident in which a self-driving Uber hit and killed a pedestrian in Arizona.

The broader picture for stock markets

Despite individual company woes, the broader macro picture is also worrying the markets. It seems reasonable to point out that a lot of selling may be taking place off the back of worries about the future of the US/China trading relationship. In response to President Trump’s tariffs on steel and aluminium enacted last month, China unveiled retaliatory duties worth $3 billion on US food imports, which was quickly followed by tariffs for over 100 goods on April 4th, including cars, certain aircraft, tobacco products, whisky and many others.

Investors will be watching closely for any further escalation in rhetoric and action. Given that both economies provide so much to the engine of global economic growth, the outcome of the trade dispute will be seen as very important for investors trying to predict the future for world stock markets.

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