Trump puts world markets on edge – but relief for stocks may be at hand

Stock markets around the world took a large blow last week. The biggest factor at play was President Trump’s instigation of new tariffs on China over concerns of intellectual property theft – the second action on trade in as many weeks after the administration enacted steel and aluminium tariffs for the Chinese and other nations.

However the other reason concerned geopolitics, and perhaps the future of the world as we know it today. The sitting National Security Adviser at the White House H.R. McMaster was axed, and Trump replaced him with a former ambassador and mouthpiece for the military-industrial complex John Bolton. This appointment has palpably raised the prospect of an armed conflict between the United States and one of its adversaries, most likely to be Iran. Indeed, John Bolton called for Israel or the US to bomb Iranian nuclear facilities as recently as 2015, in an op-ed piece for the New York Times. Bolton was also a firm supporter of the war in Iraq, which many consider to be an illegal war driven purely for the benefits of American corporate interests, including oil companies.

Trump has seen more moderate and reflective members of his administration leave in recent months. Hope Hicks, who was known as having a calming influence on the President, left her post as White House Communications Director, shortly followed by Gary Cohn – Chief Economic Adviser. A former Goldman Sachs employee, Cohn had opposed Trump’s metal tariffs, and was one of the key players behind getting the popular tax reform bill passed last year. Soon after Rex Tillerson got the chop as Secretary of State, another moderate who favoured keeping the Iran nuclear deal and seeking a diplomatic resolution to tensions on the Korean peninsula. Trump replaced him with Mike Pompeo, the former CIA Director who holds a noted aggression towards Iran.

Jeremy Bash, a former Chief of Staff at both the CIA and Defense Department said on MSNBC that Trump was “assembling a war cabinet”. Given the direction of his team, this seems hard to argue with. With less mediating influences at his side, Trump will be less likely to hear opposing arguments from more dovish staff. Instead his views on Iran may be blindly accepted in an echo chamber where voices of dissent are minimal. Ironically, Trump ran on a platform based partly on withdrawing the US from expensive overseas wars, but he has constantly reaffirmed his commitment to increase military spending since he took office.

A war in Korea has been made less likely thanks to Kim Jong Un approaching South Korean leader Moon Jae In, but a question mark still hangs over the Middle East, not only because of the possibility Trump will scrap the Iranian nuclear deal, but also the prospect of a conflict erupting over Syria, where Russian forces are still propping up the Assad regime. Just last month, The Guardian reported that scores of Russian mercenaries had been killed by US airstrikes in the country as the US attacked pro-regime forces. If events like this continue to occur, the prospect of a confrontation between the US and Russia rises. Russia already resents the fact that NATO military buildup on its borders in Eastern Europe, and it goes without saying what a war between the two could mean for the global economy.

None of this is good news for the world as a whole, except those in the military-industrial complex who hold stock in military companies!

Today though things look brighter. US stock futures are up, on reports the US and China are trying to resolve the trade dispute behind the scenes. European markets are also driving higher led by the DAX (Germany 30). We have our fingers crossed that the worlds foremost superpowers can be pragmatic, adult and reasonable – though with Trump at the helm of one of them, this is not guaranteed.

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The world economy is stronger but tensions are rising – a look at the OECD’s latest report

The OECD says the global economy will see its strongest growth in seven years in 2018 thanks to a rebound in trade and investment, though it also warned today that a trade war could threaten the recovery.

In its March 2018 interim economic outlook which used the subtitle ‘Getting stronger, but tensions are rising’, the organisation updated its outlook for G20 economies and raised its global growth forecast for 2018 and 2019 to 3.9 percent – the highest since 2011, from previous forecasts of 3.6 percent for both years.

The raised forecast is partly due to expectations that U.S. tax cuts will boost the American economy.

Here were the key positive takeaways from the report:

– Growth is improving or steady in most G20 economies

– Trade and private investment are bouncing back

– New fiscal stimulus in the United States and Germany will further boost short-term growth

– Inflation (a concern for Central Banks) is set to rise slowly

– Consumer confidence, particularly in BRIICS nations (Brazil, Russia, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa) has risen sharply

The key negatives and risks were as follows:

– Income gains, particularly for median and low income households have barely improved over the last decade

– Public and private debt in G20 nations is very high, with China leading the way at over 200 percent of GDP

– The pace of structural reform is slow, in emerging market countries especially

– An escalation of trade tensions would be damaging for growth and jobs

Regardless, the overall picture is healthier. Acting OECD Chief Economist Alvaro Pereira said: “We think that the stronger economy is here to stay for the next couple years,” He added, “We are getting back to more normal circumstances than what we’ve seen in the last 10 years.”

This is good news for investors the world over, as a more robust global economy will create a better environment in which companies can grow and expand more easily, boosting corporate results and shareholder returns.

China vows to retaliate to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminium as prospect of trade war looms

The Chinese government in Beijing has confirmed it will retaliate if the Trump administration goes ahead with a plan to place tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from China and other nations including Brazil.

In the latest progression in tensions between the 2 countries, Wang Hejun, a senior official at China’s Commerce Ministry said: “If the final decision from the U.S. hurts China’s interests, we will definitely take necessary measures to protect our rights.”

He was of course referring to proposals drawn up by U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who last week recommended Trump should impose tariffs on foreign suppliers of metals due to ‘national security’ issues, as well as unfair trade practices including steel ‘dumping’. Dumping is the process of keeping steel prices artificially low, which has the effect of pricing other producers out of the market. Republicans in Washington argue that this practice negatively impacts the ability of U.S. steel companies to compete, thus hitting communities in America which have depended strongly on manufacturing jobs, and have been decimated by the closure of factories, particularly across the rustbelt.

Trump’s more protectionist rhetoric on trade and his skepticism of globalisation resonated strongly with voters in these communities in 2016, yet this is an age-old problem that was a hot topic even under Obama. Even notoriously anti-Trump news outlet CNN formerly sympathized with his perspective. In a report in 2016, CNN said that the American steel industry was “being hurt by an unprecedented surge in unfairly traded imports, with record amounts of foreign-produced steel flooding into the United States. Cheap, subsidized foreign imports are taking steel jobs away.”

Whether these tariffs are good for the American worker is yet to be seen, because this is only the second salvo to be fired in what could become a full blown trade war, but it’s fair to say the ramifications of this action from the Trump administration will be significant, given that China produces around half the world’s steel. Trump has until mid-April to decide on whether to go ahead with the proposals, which would mark the second major action on trade after he imposed tariffs on solar panels and washing machines from the Asian superpower in January.

The move won’t be a surprise given the rhetoric Trump used during the campaign and in his first year in office. He’s set his sights on renegotiating everything from how much NATO members spend on their military budgets to coming down hard on Canada’s lumber industry, whereby the Department of Commerce set total import tariffs at above 20 per cent for most Canadian softwood lumber producers last November.

China’s Ministry of Commerce soon went on the defensive, and said the conclusions from a US departmental national security review of the steel and aluminium industries were incorrect, because China has proven its products did not threaten U.S. national security. Wang Hejun said: “The spectrum of national security is very broad. Without a clear definition, it could easily be abused. If every country followed the U.S. on this, it would have serious ramifications on the international trade order.”